KX 170B / KX 175B / KY195B Repair

KI 208, KI 209, & KI 214 Indicator Repair

Updated 9/30/14 by G.G. Glassmeyer --- Yes I am still in business, but:

I will be on vacation until 1 December 2014

KX170B.com --- Backup Site: KX170B-repair.com

--- FOUR MONTH, 120 Day Warranty ! on full service repairs ---

-- Most parts are in-stock & replaced at NO CHARGE ! --

Place your order NOW for "SAME DAY" Service

BEWARE of "EXCHANGE" & bargin radios - details below:


|||||||| . . Use "CTRL-F" to search this website . . ||||||||

FULL Service:

When you order "FULL Serivce", I repair, calibrate, and test each radio or indicator to factory new specifications. Numerous tests are performed in accordance with King Radio's Quality Acceptance Procedures before issuing a yellow-tag. This is NOT just a quick "bench check" to verify that repairs were effective. This is a complete check of all major performance specifications. Your radio or indicator will be electrically new -- like a "zero-time" engine. If your radio is not economically repairable, I will only charge partial-services to keep the costs down.

PARTIAL Service:

When you order "PARTIAL Service", I will perform only the services that you check-off on the order form. If you no longer use your NAV receiver, for example, you need not pay to have that section of your radio serviced. If your radio is not economically repairable, I will only charge for minimal services to keep the costs down.



This is the part of my laboratory used for avionics testing.


G.G.Glassmeyer: Retired Engineer
(electronics research, manufacturing & maintenance)

Aviation experience since 1970.

Since 1996 --- I have been the most highly qualified provider of electronic repairs and calibration on KX170B nav/coms, and KI208, KI209, and KI214 indicators.

Testimonials:

Sam Foote, Paridise Valley, AZ -- I just wanted to take a second to say thank you for all your help and advice with my older King radios and indicators. It only took about 45 minutes to put it back in yesterday. We checked it out on the Luke Aux ILS 109.7 and it worked PERFECTLY! The VOR indicator was within 1/2 Degree of my 6 month old KX 155 with it's older KI 208 indicator which I am sure is no surprise to you. I think in the long run, it will turn out to be the best money I ever spent on aircraft maintenance!

email received -- Fantastic web site. I love saving pilots money so they can put gas in their planes and fly. Will pass your info on to many customers I see everyday looking for help with 170's. Mark Baas, A&P, I.A., FCC, Presently working at Hillview CRS, Muskegon , MI

Brian Sprowl, Thorofare, NJ -- Again, thanks so very much, radio is working great!

Sean Cooper, Dallas, TX -- I received my KX 175B yesterday and installed it last night. Everything works great!! Thanks for the fast and the good service. I know several people with the same radio and I will pass your name on to them. Thanks again.

Fred Schumacher, Friday Harbor, WA -- Hi Gary - Got the radio last week and installed. Works great. I've done everything with it. Thanks for a job well done.

Jon Kannegaard, Sunnyvale, CA -- Exceptional. Above and beyond the call of service. Fast. Helpful.

Robert Wagonner, Barstow, CA -- radio tested great - this guy knows what he's doing .. HIGHLY Recommended, EXCELENT turnaround, sending next radio.

Dr. Daniel willard -- Great Transaction Thank You.... Have a wonderful day.

John Seeler, Bristol, NH -- Gary, I have taken a couple of flights with the indicators (KI-214 & KI201-C) that you repaired, and they work great. I just wanted to say thank you.

Bob Mc Eneany, Las Vegas, NV -- Extremely fast delivery, Excellent communication, Fine condition, Thank you Gary

Mark Nicolayev, Spreckels, CA -- This was a fun deal. Everything went as planned.... Thanks.

Craig, email received -- I really appreciate your continued involvement with the aviation community. As I'm sure you are well aware, your expertise is widely known and very much appreciated!!!

Gaylord Wynters, Corona, CA --- Thank you for the information and the quick service. I appreciate your honesty and will spread the word about your services to my pilot friends.

Van Ellis, Ardmore OK --- Gary, Received the KI 214 in good order Mon the 3rd, installed it Tues the 4th, and tested it this morning. It now receives the GS signal at Ardmore Ok where I need it for my checkride. All segments (GS Loc and VOR) that I was able to fly this morning worked fine. Thank you for your prompt, courteous and capable service.




Indicator Information

The indicators pictured just above are the ones commonly used with King radios and the ONLY ones that I work on. Top left is a KI208, a newer design. The KI208 is much more reliable than the previous KI201C which is on the lower left. The KI201C is obsolete and it is typically more expensive to repair than it is to find a used servicable one. The KI209 is on the upper right, it too is a newer, more reliable design. It is essentially a KI208 VOR/LOC converter/indicator which also has a glideslope indicator needle included. A separate glideslope receiver is needed to drive its horizontal needle. The KI214 is on the bottom right, it is a self contained unit with a built-in glideslope receiver, but it is an older design. Each channel in the KI214 is individually tunable and it must be re-calibrated about once every three to five years.

If you can tune a VOR station and hear the IDENT tone your radio is probably ok -- the problem is most likely in the indicator -- so send me the indicator, NOT the radio, but CHECK IT FOR STICKY NEEDLES AND FLAGS FIRST (as shown just below).


How to Check an Indicator For "Sticky" Needles and flags
Hold your indicator on the connector end firmly between your thumb and middle finger. Hold the OBS knob with your other hand. Twist the connector end back and forth with a quick twisting motion. Observe the needles and flags to insure that they move through their full range of motion without sticking or hesitating.

Further testing should then be done by an experienced person using an ohm meter as a source to drive needles and flags back and fourth with the meter in a normal upright position.

Because these indicator needle and flag assemblies are very old, they cannot be guaranteed to not stick. There is no warantee on indicator meters that stick. If your KI 214 is sticking, it cannot be made airworthy and will have to be replaced. Expect to pay about $1000.00 for a yellow-tagged one.


Remove Your KX-170B radio in 5 Minutes
Just insert a 3/32" allen (hex) wrench in the front panel retaining screw head. With one finger and your thumb turn the screw 1 TURN COUNTER-CLOCKWISE (DO NOT USE EXCESSIVE FORCE). (If you go much more than 1 turn you will certainly damage the radio.) (You are just turning the locking pawl 90 degrees --- this is not a long screw that is turned many times as is the case with many other radios when removing them.) Firmly grasp the frequency selector knobs, wiggle it left and right, and pull the radio out. Reverse these steps to install your KX170B.


Any radio damaged as a result of using excessive force on the allen wrench will not be covered by warranty should this abuse cause damage to internal wafer switches.

Please read "A Word About Indicators" below before sending an indicator in for repair.

How to pack your radio or indicator


Surround the radio or indicator with RUBBER FOAM or several layers of bubble wrap. Please do not use Styrofoam sheets or "peanut" packing. Do not use "pillow bubbles". The front and back of the radio or indicator must have 6" of packing material and the package be marked "FRAGILE". With any less packing than this the radio or indicator will almost certainly be damaged.

The front & back must have 6" of rubber foam or bubble wrap firmly attached to them.

The package must be marked FRAGILE.


Ordering Details


------ U.S.A. sales ONLY ------

----- NO FBO's -----

----- NO Aviation Businesses -----

----- NO Third Party Deals -----

----->>> Aircraft owners ONLY <<<-----



ORDERING INSTRUCTIONS:

Highlight the ENTIRE order form, copy it, paste it to a word processor, fill it out, print it and send it with your radio or indicator to: G.G. Glassmeyer, dept. 721, 69487 Interlake Road, Lockwood, CA. 93932

Please double-check the entire form for errors or omissions.


Beginning of ORDER FORM

DATE:

YOUR NAME:

ADDRESS:


EMAIL ADDRESS:

MODEL NUMBER: [ ]KX170B, [ ]KX175B, [ ]KY195B, [ ]KI208, [ ]KI209, [ ]KI214 NO OTHER MODELS SUPPORTED

VISA OR MASTERCARD NUMBER (16 digits)(Please don't ask me to call you):

EXPIRATION DATE:

THREE (3) NUMBERS ON BACK OF CARD: ________ I have double-checked all card information [__](Is your balance sufficient?)

(Please verify that this radio or indicator does not have intermittent problems.) [___] No, it does not.

(I have tested my indicator to not have "sticky" needles or flags. (See indicator info.) [___] Tested.

YOUR AIRCRAFT TAIL NUMBER:

BREIF DESCRIPTION OF THE PROBLEM(s):

You will be charged as follows:
One single-problem $225
Each additional major problem ADD $150
Each minor problem ADD $50

[X] MINIMAL SERVICES (required)(if no problems are found):
*** Base charge (unpacking, new box, packing, cushion material, shipping, etc.) $35
*** Testing & Evaluation (bench check) $40
*** Standard Mail $25


SERVICES REQUESTED:


---- [ ] FULL Service ----

If it can be seen that repairs are going to exceed $600, I will return the radio to you with a minimum of charges that will just cover the work done to that point.


---- [ ] PARTIAL SERVICE (COM's and NAV-COM's only) ----

[ ] COM transmitter only---

[ ] COM receiver only---

[ ] NAV receiver only---

ADDITIONAL PARTIAL SERVICES:

-- WARRANTY, [ ] 30-day $10, [ ] 60-day $20, [ ] 120-day $40
[ ] INVOICE (with repair details) NEEDED $25
[ ] "PRIORITY MAIL" ADD $10 (standard mail is $25, total = $35)


TELEPHONE NUMBER: ________________ I MUST be able to contact YOU personally at this number during the day or early evening, if needed, for corrections. Answering machines, secretaries, voice mail, etc. don't get it ! PLEASE be available. Please do not ask me to call you for anything. Everything you need to know to get your radio repaired is on the website.

I have filled out this form COMPLETELY and I authorize expenditures, as needed, to test, repair and ship my radio.[ ]

SIGNATURE:___________________________________________ (Aircraft Owner) Authorization # 72114

If you can afford a 3-4 day delay please check ----> [ ] "NO RUSH" (This really helps to smooth my backlog)

-----End of order form -----

Please double-check the entire form for errors or omissions. KX170B serial numbers below 35,000 may not be repairable because of parts not being available.


Shipping via UPS:

Please make sure that a signature is not required (which may cause several days delay).

Please send 1) your radio or indicator, and 2) the completed ORDER FORM


* UPS is the best delivery service for shipping TO me -- FedEx is OK, but they often delay delivery by a couple of days (to my remote location). Recently UPS shipping stations have been telling a few customers that my address is not valid, but I have been receiving shipments from UPS for over 25 years at this address -- go figure! Tell them to ship to my address regardless of what their computer is telling them!

* United States Postal Service (USPS) is the only delivery service that is available to me for my outgoing shipments.


I am retired -- out of the rat race -- and trying to enjoy my "golden years" living a relaxed lifestyle.


Flat Rate radio Repairs

If you are NOT in a hurry (I am retired and I am not in a hurry) I can do a single-problem, flat-rate repair for $225 (+ $25 return shipping) = $250.

TYPICAL TURN-AROUND TIME IS 2 WORKING DAYS (98%) However there are times when I receive four or five radios on the same day and I am then overloaded. I refuse to rush or do a job poorly, so I must then postphone work. It doesn't happen often, but it does happen.

I repair King radios because I think that they are the best aircraft radio ever made and I enjoy helping fellow pilots to keep them going.

I am fully retired.

Please understand that I am not running a typical business and I don't conduct business the way most others do.

Full-Service radios are warranteed for four months - 120 days.

TYPICAL REPAIR PROBLEMS ENCOUNTERED:

COM power supply repair
COM transmit circuit repair
COM defective transmit/receive switching
COM frequency calibration check
COM master oscillator repair
COM replace frequency determining crystal (if out of spec.)
COM replace a second frequency determining crystal (if out of spec.)
COM MISC. (lubricate freq selectors, check power output, modulation adjust.)
COM frequency selector switch contact alignment & de-oxidation
COM broken wafer switch repair
COM audio section repair
COM mechanical repairs

COM power supply repair
COM frequency calibration check
COM fix low sensitivity problem
COM receiver circuit repair
COM master oscillator repair
COM replace frequency determining crystal (if out of spec.)
COM replace a second frequency determining crystal (if out of spec.)
COM MISC. (lubricate freq selectors, fix knobs, etc.)
COM frequency selector switch contact alignment & de-oxidation
COM broken wafer switch repair
COM audio section repair
COM volume control repair
COM mechanical repairs
COM adjust squelch

NAV power supply repair
NAV frequency calibration check
NAV fix low sensitivity problem
NAV master oscillator repair
NAV replace frequency determining crystal
NAV replace a second frequency determining crystal
NAV MISC. (lubricate freq selectors, fix knobs, etc.)
NAV frequency selector switch contact de-oxidation
NAV VOR/LOC output repairs
NAV audio section repair
NAV volume control repair
NAV mechanical repairs

Your radio must meet these criteria for a flat-rate repair:

  • It has only a single failure.  (A second major problem adds $150 to the total, minor problems are repaired at $50 each).
  • No mechanical damage.
  • It is complete -- no missing parts and it is shipped using at least 4 inches of bubble wrap or RUBBER FOAM around the front and back of the radio or indicator. Wrap the box generously with filament or banding tape. Mark the box "FRAGILE"

Contact J.A. Air Center in West Chicago for MAC 1700 service. (www.jaair.com) (800-323-5966)

If your KX170B or indicator has a serious problem** (rare) and is not repairable, it will be returned to you with just a $35 base charge plus a $40 testing and evaluation charge. You must pay for return shipping, or I will dispose of the KX170B if you prefer to save shipping costs.

** One serious problem is that of the COM kilohertz frequency selector dial jamming when the knob is turned. This is the end of the road for the KX170B. Your best option here would be to slide out the bad KX170B and slide in a good one.

** If your radio blows its circuit breaker chances are it is seriously defective and not economical to repair.

** Another serious problem occurs when a radio or indicator is shipped without the recommended 4" minimum of bubble wrap or RUBBER FOAM packing material being used on the front and back of the radio or indicator. If the front panel gets bent during shipping the labor cost increases by $150 for straightening the front panel and the drive gears behind it.

** SERIOUS PROBLEMS SHOW UP MOSTLY IN THESE KINDS OF KX170B'S:

  • "EXCHANGE RADIOS"
  • "Older" radios --- serial numbers under 35,000.
  • Auction radios.
  • Avionics shop rejects
  • Bargin priced radios (under about $600) without recent yellow tags.
  • Radios with "green tags" or "red tags".
  • A radio that you don't know the history of.
  • A radio that some one gave you.
  • A radio that has not been regularly (monthly) used.

If your radio has been used frequently (once a week at least) in an active aircraft chances are good that it can be repaired for the flat-rate fee of only $225. (By the way, warming the radio up and turning the frequency selector knobs through 360 degrees and turning the volume controls often is good for it.)

** Most other problems can be repaired for the flat-rate of $225.


Answers to Common Questions


Nobody can tell you if a radio or indicator is repairable until it is first fully tested in a laboratory with sophisticated test equipment.


=== My radio is getting "weaker" as time goes on, can you fix my "weak" radio? Although a radio's performance parameters are measured in more specific scientific terms using numbers rather than subjective terms such as "weak", the problem is never the less generally understood. The antenna system is extremely important here and must be considered first in this situation. Even harder to accept is the fact that pilots, in particular, are going deaf at a faster rate than the general population and the "weakness" may well be in the pilots ears.

Only rarely is there anything broken in a radio that would produce a "weakness". They usually either work well, or not at all. A radio must be broken in order to fix it --- there are thousands of components in a radio that might produce "weakness" and a partially defective component would be nearly impossible to find,so if this "weakness" truely is in the radio, it would be too expensive to repair. Replacing the radio with a good one is the best option and temporarily replacing the radio with another one might help in solving the problem.

Don't forget the audio panel as a critical part of the overall system, as well as your microphone and headset or speaker and all of their connections. I unplug my headset after each use to keep its contacts clean.

=== Would you give us any credit for our broken KX-170B ? --- No, I have 20 - 30 broken KX170B's now. I don't need any more. Find out what is wrong with your broken KX170B, it might be repairable. Try to find out what the avionics shop determined was the problem (when they told you it was not repairable and you should buy a new radio instead of repairing your KX170B).

=== Is your operation there an FAA certified repair station? --- No, FAA certified repair stations must be located on a public airport and competition is not encouraged by the FAA so most repair stations are separated by large distances and are located near heavily populated areas. I used to own the first licensed FAA repair station at the San Luis Obispo, California airport - certificate number 418-1, so I have done the drill and know what is required by the FAA. I support their standards and practice them fully. It is my belief that my credentials and quality standards far exceed that of many avionics shops. I am fully retired in a remote rural region and provide support to King radios and it is gratifying to me to help so many owners keep these radios and their indicators going. Many of my customers are avionics shops that no longer have the expertise to service these "older" radios. It is your responsibility to meet any requirements to keep your airplane "legal".

=== You mention different color tags but I am not familiar with the exact meaning of each color. Could you please give me a brief explanation of the meaning of green and yellow tags? --- YELLOW - Serviceable (functionally like new). GREEN - Repairable (it's broken, but might be able to be fixed). RED - Reject (beyond economical repair, junk, scrap, might have useable parts).

=== My KI214 receives some glideslope frequencies, but not others, and some are very weak. Can you fix this kind of a problem? --- Yes, a repair is needed. The VOR, LOC, and glideslope functions will all be tested. Indicators should be tested about every three to five years.

=== My COM transmitter is "weak" can you tune it up? --- The KX170B series of radios either work or they don't, they are rarely low on output power, and even if they were, it would not make much difference since signal strength is a logarithmic function. There are also no adjustments to raise or lower the power of the transmitter. Your antenna or transmission cable may be defective, but most often insufficient altitude or a bad antenna system is the problem. Aircraft VHF radios are essentially line-of-sight. If you can't see the lights (at night) of the station you are trying to reach, chances are communications won't be good.

=== How can I tell if my COM transmitter and receiver are working on ALL frequencies? --- Borrow a handheld transceiver if you don't have one and get someone else to operate it from several hundred feet away. All frequencies do not need to literally be checked, just 118.xxx - 135.xxx and then xxx.000 - xxx.975 MHz. In other words, check all whole MHz frequencies with the fractional KHz selector set at any position; then check all fractional KHz positions at any whole MHz position. Be sure to avoid 121.5, local tower, ground, clearance delivery, ATIS, etc. frequencies. Keep your transmissions short such as "test", "roger", "test", "roger", and so on as you switch through a pre-arranged written list of test frequencies that you are each working from.

=== My radio works in my friends plane but not in mine -- what could be wrong? --- Most likely it is the microphone or headset connection. The connectors must be bright and shiny clean. Many are made of brass which tarnishes over time. Clean these connectors all over using a fine emory cloth. The jack (receptacal) must also be cleaned. Next likely is broken wires either in the headset or possibly between the jack and the radio. Finally the problem could be in the antenna / feedline system. At some point you may need the help of an avionics shop.

=== How reliable are VOR / LOC and glideslope indicators? --- Indicators have a high degree of reliablility, but when shooting an approach you cannot tolerate ANY errors. Check VOR #1 against VOR #2 before takeoff, also check each indicator on a Localizer frequency. The LOC needle should be centered when checked with a ramp test set. When shooting a precision approach using a glideslope indicator, cross-check your altitude frequently to make sure that you are not too low. If the glideslope system should fail it can take up to 20 seconds before an indicator warning flag pops up. Shooting an approach with a single radio system is inviting disaster and should not be done. Indicators need to be calibrated about every three to five years.

=== Do you have a MAC 1700 or MX 170B for sale? --- I no longer stock MAC 1700's mostly because of the very limited demand for them and partly because they are not compatable with some indicators. Contact J.A. Air Center in Chicago for MAC 1700 service. The MAC 1700 is 95% a KX 170B so it has most of the reliability of a KX 170B -- an MX 170B is an altogether different radio designed to plug-in to a KX 170B mounting rack, but it does not have the long track record of reliability of the KX 170B. I specialize in KX 170B's and do not have any MX170B's for sale.

1. Are all the KX-170/170B/175/175B series radios totally "slide in compatible" with each other and their trays? ---- Yes.

2. If so, might this "slide in compatibility" depend on what model indicators or external GS receivers may also be in the loop? --- Each indicator wired to the back of the radio must be compatible with the radio and have a connector that mates to that particular indicator. Commonly used with the KX17xx series radios are KI 201/B/C, 208, 209, and 214. The KI 209 requires an external GS receiver. MAC 1700's use solid state rather than mechanical switching and are not compatible with some indicators. Contact J.A. Air Center in Chicago for MAC 1700 service.

3. Splitters? Is there anything I can do to minimize the signal strength losses caused by a NAV1/NAV2/GS splitter short of installing additional antennas and cabling? --- NO - laws of physics rule here!

4. My KI-214 has always "seemed a bit weak". Even when working good it still seemed to "hook up" and get a good signal only after the number 2 radio's Ki-208 was giving good indications. Is this necessarily the "stuff" caused by splitters or is this another problem? --- Every radio receiving system (which includes the antenna, the splitter and the cable going to the antenna) will have its own "sensitivity" to signal reception with noticeable variations. Antenna placement, antenna cable condition, altitude, mountains and distance from the station are all very important factors in determining signal strength too.

5. If an indicator, such as a 214, checks out good on the bench and is calibrated and aligned with optimum bench generated signals, what happens when the indicator goes into an aircraft that uses an antenna splitter for two navs and a glideslope. Can this less than optimum installation be compensated for during alignment in the shop? --- The splitter in this case will divide the signal strength going to the GS receiver by about 1/3. This might be compensated by adding a pre-amplifier, but that would be adding to the complexity and the reliability of this critical system.

The KI 214 has an extremely sensitive receiver which should give you a solid indication when intercepting the ILS (even with a splitter), but the receiver has about 45 to 50 "touchy" adjustments that need to be made every 3 to 5 years in order to insure that the indicator will work well. This is the most likely cause of reception problems.

6. Can you give me a likely prognosis or an educated guess as to what the 214 might need? Repair? Single Failure/Flat Rate? Or perhaps anything else I can do to better diagnose the 214's problem? --- The KI 214 needs to be tested in the laboratory with the proper test instruments to determine its problems. It is most likely a single major problem.


A Word About Indicators

VOR/LOC and Glideslope indicators are connected to the end of a long chain of components which comprise a navigation system. If the indicator is behaving strangely, a common reaction is to believe that something is wrong with the indicator when, in fact, the indicator is OK.

You MUST verify that all of the components preceding the indicator are performing to established specifications, using the proper test equipment, before the indicator can be considered suspect. Here are SOME of the major links in this critical chain that must be checked:

  • VOR/LOC antenna Standing Wave Ratio (SWR)
  • Glideslope antenna Standing Wave Ratio (SWR)
  • Landing gear, exhaust stacks, or other obstructions near the antenna
  • Antenna cable connections and connectors
  • Pinched, abraded, or flattened coaxial cables
  • "Diplexers" or "splitters" used to feed two radios from one antenna (these devices reduce the signal strength by 1/2)
  • VOR/LOC level adjustment in the KX170
  • Receiving the VOR station and hearing the IDENT tone.
  • Connections from back of the radio to back of indicator
  • Power input to indicator
  • Signal input to indicator
  • Antenna connection to glideslope receiver

In addition to these items, the airplane must be airborne at an altitude sufficiently high to "see" directly to the received station. The battery must be in good condition, receiving a charge from the alternator, and 13.75 volts (or 27.5 volts) must be getting to all sections of the navigation equipment.

Before you condemn an indicator you must MEASURE its inputs with the proper test equipment to verify that they are of the proper and sufficient level.

Swapping your indicator with a known good one and comparing the two is a good way to determine its condition.


Intermittent Problems

No one can repair any electronic equipment unless it is broken and it STAYS broken. If you have a radio or indicator that works sometimes but not others, IT CANNOT BE ECONOMICALLY REPAIRED.

It will only waste your time packing and shipping and my time unpacking, testing, doing paper work, re-packing and shipping if you send me something that is not solidly broken. I charge $225 + $25 return shipping if you send me an intermittent failure item.

Please don't send me something that is intermittent or which does not have a clearly defined problem. The best thing to do is to replace the radi with another (good) one.

Having said that, there are a couple of intermittent problems that are repairable. They are ones that come and go when you wiggle frequency selector knobs, power on-off switches or volume control knobs. If you use a handheld nav/com as a signal source you can see if you have this kind of a problem while keying the handheld radio and wiggling the controls of your KX 170B.



Be Careful When Buying Used or Exchange Radios



  • Exchange radios are most likely older radios, with low serial numbers (below 35,000).

    They do not have all of the latest modifications and improvements.

    They may "work", but be very unreliable.

    They will probably have a poor appearance and not perform as well as your existing KX170B.

    I would recommend you keep your existing KX170B and have it repaired rather than exchange it and inherit an unknown set of new problems.



  • The average auction price for a used KX-170B is $457.
  • 80% of used auction KX170B's are NOT airworthy. (I know - because, in the past, I used to buy a lot of them.)
  • Auction KX170B's typically have 3 to 6 significant problems that require repairs in order to be airworthy.
  • Most avionics shops will not work on KX-170/175,A/B series radios.
  • Those shops that do work on them are charging $300 to $600 for simple repairs.

Do the math -- you will most likely pay $750 to $1000 to eventually get the radio fully functional!

  • Do you know if all 720 COM channels work?
  • Do all 200 NAV channels work?
  • What are the receiver sensitivities (miles range)?
  • Is the transmitter frequency within specifications?
  • Is the transmitter modulating 100% of your voice power?

Look out for radios or indicators ads that say "removed for upgrade", "working when removed", "working fine", "selling as-is". --- What does that mean ??



Front Panel Cosmetic Condition

A complete faceplate refurbishment is a long process which is much more difficult than it seems at first thought. It is NOT a simple peel-and-stick process as the sellers of those faceplate overlays would have you believe. The front panel paint has to be removed and redone, old overlays have to be removed, frequency windows must be cut out and reset. Damage to the radio is possible if you are not very careful.

I no longer provide this service.


Buyer pays ALL shipping charges. All sales are final -- no returns.


G.G.Glassmeyer: Retired Engineer
(electronics research, manufacturing & maintenance)

Division Manager - electronics manufacturing & maintenance - Computer Sciences Corp. (CSC)

University Professor - electronics - California Polytechnic State University

Pilot and Engineer -ionospheric radio research - Stanford Research Institute (SRI)

Avionics Repair Station Owner - (FAA Certified Repair Station 418-1)

Engineering Technician -electronics - Technical Materiel Corp. (TMC Research)

Surveyor - US Army.

Private Pilot, Instrument, Multi-engine rated, 4000 hours. BSIT / MAed. - California Polytechnic State University

Aircraft owned: Piper Colt, BD-4 (I built), Wren 460 Super STOL, Moni motorglider, Cessna 182, Cessna 150/150HP (Lycoming O-320), Cessna 337 Skymaster.

FCC Commercial Radio License


Testimonials:

Sam Foote, Paridise Valley, AZ -- I just wanted to take a second to say thank you for all your help and advice with my older King radios and indicators. It only took about 45 minutes to put it back in yesterday. We checked it out on the Luke Aux ILS 109.7 and it worked PERFECTLY! The VOR indicator was within 1/2 Degree of my 6 month old KX 155 with it's older KI 208 indicator which I am sure is no surprise to you. I think in the long run, it will turn out to be the best money I ever spent on aircraft maintenance!

email received -- Fantastic web site. I love saving pilots money so they can put gas in their planes and fly. Will pass your info on to many customers I see everyday looking for help with 170's. Mark Baas, A&P, I.A., FCC, Presently working at Hillview CRS, Muskegon , MI

Brian Sprowl, Thorofare, NJ -- Again, thanks so very much, radio is working great!

Sean Cooper, Dallas, TX -- I received my KX 175B yesterday and installed it last night. Everything works great!! Thanks for the fast and the good service. I know several people with the same radio and I will pass your name on to them. Thanks again.

Fred Schumacher, Friday Harbor, WA -- Hi Gary - Got the radio last week and installed. Works great. I've done everything with it. Thanks for a job well done.

Jon Kannegaard, Sunnyvale, CA -- Exceptional. Above and beyond the call of service. Fast. Helpful.

Robert Wagonner, Barstow, CA -- radio tested great - this guy knows what he's doing .. HIGHLY Recommended, EXCELENT turnaround, sending next radio.

Dr. Daniel willard -- Great Transaction Thank You.... Have a wonderful day.

John Seeler, Bristol, NH -- Gary, I have taken a couple of flights with the indicators (KI-214 & KI201-C) that you repaired, and they work great. I just wanted to say thank you.

Bob Mc Eneany, Las Vegas, NV -- Extremely fast delivery, Excellent communication, Fine condition, Thank you Gary

Mark Nicolayev, Spreckels, CA -- This was a fun deal. Everything went as planned.... Thanks.

Craig, email received -- I really appreciate your continued involvement with the aviation community. As I'm sure you are well aware, your expertise is widely known and very much appreciated!!!

Gaylord Wynters, Corona, CA --- Thank you for the information and the quick service. I appreciate your honesty and will spread the word about your services to my pilot friends.

Van Ellis, Ardmore OK --- Gary, Received the KI 214 in good order Mon the 3rd, installed it Tues the 4th, and tested it this morning. It now receives the GS signal at Ardmore Ok where I need it for my checkride. All segments (GS Loc and VOR) that I was able to fly this morning worked fine. Thank you for your prompt, courteous and capable service.



Buyer pays ALL shipping charges. All sales are final -- no returns. Warranty is four months, 120 days on full-service orders.

The answers to 99.9% of questions are answered above.

I do not do avionics consulting on other than the few items that I specialize in and cannot advise you on other equipment types or on the unique installation in your aircraft.

Everything you need to know to get your radio repaired is somewhere above (use your search function "CTRL-F" to find words)